News & Events

Nonprofits often seek out Board members who bring valuable skills or experiences to the table but who may not have previous experience on Boards or a background in corporate governance. These Board members might represent the beneficiaries of the organization, have strong ties to the community or bring a specific skillset which the Board needs. While every Board member will bring their own area of expertise, it is important that every Board member has an understanding of nonprofit governance. This template is designed to identify any gaps which the Board may need to address with training.

This is a letter of appointment template for new board members. The template allows a chairperson to easily communicate a new board member’s responsibilities, duties, and term of office.

Below you can read the document Commentary on Charities Amendment Bill 2022, prepared for Carmichael by Professor Oonagh Breen of UCD and Philip Smith of Arthur Cox Solicitors

This Scheme of Delegation sets out the authority delegated by the Board of Trustees (the Board) of The Organisation to the Chief Executive (or designated deputy/interim CEO when The Organisation is without a Chief Executive). Here are the guidelines on how to manage the provision of authority to the Chief Executive.

 

Carmichael has prepared a new template on ‘Schedule of matters reserved for the Board’. This template is intended for guidance purposes only. All organisations should develop their document.

In April 2021, the Chartered Governance Institute UK & Ireland published a guidance note on ‘Improving Charity Boardroom Behaviours’.

Introducing the guidance Louise Thomson, Head of Policy (Not for Profit) at The Chartered Governance Institute said:
“Good governance is about more than just having the right policies, procedures and protocols in place. If the people responsible for leading the charity are ignorant of them, or unable or unwilling to adhere to them, governance falls down. This is why boardroom behaviours and the ethical practices, values and culture of the charity are of equal importance. This guidance provides examples of positive behaviours that should help trustees to make constructive challenge and good decisions that further the charitable objects and lead to positive changes.”

Using this guidance as a reference, Carmichael have summarised a shorter guidance note on ‘Behaviours of an Effective CEO’.

In April 2021, the Chartered Governance Institute UK & Ireland published a guidance note on ‘Improving Charity Boardroom Behaviours’.

Introducing the guidance Louise Thomson, Head of Policy (Not for Profit) at The Chartered Governance Institute said:
“Good governance is about more than just having the right policies, procedures and protocols in place. If the people responsible for leading the charity are ignorant of them, or unable or unwilling to adhere to them, governance falls down. This is why boardroom behaviours and the ethical practices, values and culture of the charity are of equal importance. This guidance provides examples of positive behaviours that should help trustees to make constructive challenge and good decisions that further the charitable objects and lead to positive changes.”

Using this guidance as a reference, Carmichael have summarised a shorter guidance note on ‘Behaviours of an Effective Charity Trustee’.

Carmichael’s CEO, Diarmaid Ó Corrbuí was a guest on the Diligent – BoardEffect Board Governance webinar series speaking to host Mark Wilson, Governance Advisor with BoardEffect on the topic of “Managing boards in a hybrid environment” on the 31st of March. Below you can download an edited transcript of the discussion.

Hybrid meetings are meetings in which some participants are present in person, and others are
present online. This requires video conferencing software like Zoom, Microsoft Teams or Google
Hangouts and hardware such as cameras and microphones for those present in the room. As more
and more organisations move towards hybrid meetings, it’s important to make sure your hybrid
meetings are as efficient and engaging as possible. We’ve gathered our top tips below.

A significant governance function for the board of any non-profit organisation is to ensure that there is a proportionate Risk Management System in place, including a Risk Register. There are a number of approaches and frameworks for developing these and this document reflects the framework recommended by the Charities Regulator, though any non-profit may find it useful. This document is intended for guidance only and all organisations should develop their own Risk Management System and Risk Register.